News

Ohio Prisons Report 11 Year Low In Recidivsm – February 24, 2011
Ohio prison officials say the state has hit an 11-year low in the rate of inmates winding up back behind bars after they get out. The Department of Rehabilitation and Correction said Thursday that 34 percent of Ohio inmates now return to prison within three years of release, down from the previous recidivism rate of 36.4 percent.



Correcting Corrections: Departed IDOC Commissioner Crusades For Sentencing Reforms – February 22, 2011
Ed Buss ran the state's prison system from August 2008 through mid-February, and he says Indiana needs dramatic changes to cut down on the prison population.



Correcting Corrections: Packed Prisons
In Monday’s Journal Gazette article "Packed Prisons Burden Budgets" Ron Shawgo highlights how Indiana’s adult population has more than doubled in the last two decades and how this rapid growth is putting a big strain on budgets.



The Solution To Indiana’s High Prison Costs – January 22, 2011
"Ordinarily, a kind mention in the New York Times — there have actually been a few, lately — sends me back for a serious rethink of whatever action or stance gave rise to the compliment. But this week’s support for our proposed criminal justice reforms in Indiana will engender no second thoughts, because the Times has it right — we can be a lot smarter about our incarceration policies." –Mitch Daniels



The Road To Re-Entry – December 2010
From an offender’s first day, the Indiana Department of Correction starts driving the offender down the road to re-entry by providing solution-based re-entry programs. By focusing on the vital areas of character, education, employment, family, health, and housing, programs provided by the DOC focus on breaking down any barriers to re-entry, while still promoting public safety.



From Tax Payers To Tax Drainers – August 2, 2010
"The average prison term in Ohio is about two years, and about 62 percent of those sentenced to prison serve terms of one year or less, meaning ex-offenders will be returning to their communities.In the past, probation departments individually monitored those ex-offenders, but due to the explosion in the number of prisoners, the average probation officer now has 100 ex-offenders on their case book, according to Federal Judge Walter Rice." –Ron Osburn



Attorney General Holder Wants To Get Serious About Prisoner Re-Entry - July 15, 2010
Accordingly, the Justice Department will be distributing almost four times as much in reentry grants this year as last (still only $100 million, not nearly enough, but movement in the right direction). And that, Holder announced, is why he's established a Sentencing and Corrections Working Group, which is looking at federal sentencing practices in an attempt to determine how to better prepare federal prisoners for transition back into their communities.



Too Many Prisoners, too high of a cost - July 4, 2010
At stake are billions of dollars in taxpayer money, improved public safety and the future for tens of thousands of men and women, many of whom don't really belong in state prisons but are sent there because of a lack of community-based alternatives.


 

Governor Announces Partnership to Improve Public Safety - June 28, 2010
Governor Mitch Daniels today announced a new partnership with the Pew Center on the States and the Council of State Governments (CSG) Justice Center aimed at improving public safety by reducing recidivism and managing the growth of Indiana's prison population. This will be the first comprehensive review of Indiana's criminal code and sentencing policies since 1976.


 

Marion County Crowding State Prisons-June 20, 2010
Short-term offenders are strangling Indiana's prison system, according to Indiana Department of Correction Commissioner Edwin Buss.


 

State Prison Officials Push for Sentencing Reform - June 10, 2010
There’s not much Indiana’s two major political parties agree on these days, but there is one area of consensus: The state can no longer afford to support its growing prison population.


 

Prisons prepared to Care for Mentally Ill - June 6, 2010
A recent study found that a mentally ill person is three times more likely to end up behind bars than in a hospital, a situation that has many county jails unprepared to handle the number of inmates that need care or medication.